Invitation Wording Ideas for Special Events

How to format a printed invite.

Writing formal invitations for special events and meetings is easier than most people would think. Too often people are searching for a sample invitation letter when they really mean to find the format that provides invitation wording ideas. In my experience, the fun part is to figure out how creative you can be in selecting stationery for your invitation.

But the formal invitation is an important element of the total package of invitation letters and materials used for events.

Invitations are presented in many different formats, including telephone calls, email, letters, hand-written stationery and formal invitations. Let’s focus on the printed formal invitation.

In her book Guide to Executive Manners, Letitia Baldrige warns about the importance of catching errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation. She also advises that a graphic designer oversee the production to help maximize the impact of the invitation.

Sample Formal Invitation

Regardless of the function, the best approach for event planners is to establish a standard format for themselves, and update specifics depending on the actual event.

A formal invitation should be simple and formatted on a card or stationery stock that is the size of a greeting card or smaller. Most invitations use a font that matches the organization’s standard fonts or a script that the designer likes. The key is to make sure you’re following the hosts brand standards while creating a sense of formality.

The invitation should contain the following information:
[Insert logo]

[Insert host name, title]
requests the pleasure of your company
at the
[Insert formal name of the event]
[Insert location]

[Insert event tagline if appropriate]

[Insert day, date(s), year]

R.S.V.P.
[Insert name]
[Insert phone number]
[Insert email if appropriate]

Details to follow

Note, it’s important for the designer to format the individual lines so that it fits the available space of the final invitation.

Rob is editor of Business Travel Destinations. He was voted among the top 10 business travel bloggers by USA TODAY 10Best. Rob reviews international destinations for meetings and events — where business travelers go, the hotels where they stay and their lifestyle preferences on the road. He spent more than a decade planning hundreds of corporate events throughout the U.S. for a Fortune 50 company, including meetings, conferences, seminars, executive retreats and other special events. Rob was previously the event planning guide for About.com (owned by The New York Times Company) from 2007 – 2011. His articles have appeared in business travel publications and travel sites internationally.